July 02, 2003

Journalistic Hyperbole Watch Regular readers

Journalistic Hyperbole Watch

Regular readers of this blog know that I haven't been white-washing the very real difficulties facing coalition troops in Iraq--whether continued combat, resentment in some quarters of the local populace, difficulties restoring basic services, and so on. But some journalists are getting carried away.

Here's Edmund Andrews in today's NYT discussing Iraq's "plague of violence." As pointed out here, plague often has a biblical connotation as per some kind of divine retribution. To be sure, every coalition (and innocent civilian) death is immensely regrettable. But resistance among some Iraqi and perhaps foreign fighters, even if organized (which I'm not sure it is), doesn't constitute a plague--whatever that might mean in this context.

Meanwhile, this Deb Reichmann AP story (prominently featured on both the NYT and WaPo Internet sites until this morning) has "public optimism about the war slipping" in the face of an "ever higher" U.S. death toll. But wait, I thought the war (or at least major combat operations) was over.

This primer gives a sense of the current levels of resistance. Significant, but surely not like full-fledged war. And yet, key Senator John Warner says the "war is still on."

I think the next month will be critical in determining whether we are facing significant, top-down coordinated guerrilla resistance or merely low-level, localized and sporadic resistance that will wane in the coming months. I'd bet on the latter at this stage.

UPDATE: See Andrew Sullivan on all this too.

Posted by Gregory at July 2, 2003 01:28 PM
Comments
Reviews of Belgravia Dispatch
"Awake"
--New York Times
"Must-read list"
--Washington Times
"Always Thoughtful"
--Glenn Reynolds, Instapundit
"Pompous Ass"
--an anonymous blogospheric commenter
Recent Entries
Search
English Language Media
Foreign Affairs Commentariat
Non-English Language Press
U.S. Blogs
Western Europe
France
United Kingdom
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
Spain
Central and Eastern Europe
CIS/FSU
Russia
Armenia
East Asia
China
Japan
South Korea
Middle East
Egypt
Israel
Lebanon
Syria
Columnists
Think Tanks
Security
Books
B.D. In the Press
Archives
Categories
Syndicate this site:
XML RSS RDF

G2E

Powered by