April 03, 2004

For the Record

We remember the Fallujah victims.

Permit me to echo both the thoughts of Glenn (particularly his use of the word "rot") and Tacitus (particularly his thoughts on "small men" and the memorial fund).

I should add that after reading these petty, narcissistic and moronic musings, I wanted to take a shower.

An U.S. citizen who reacts to the charred limbs of Americans being hung for display after being mutilated with a "screw them" is bad enough.

But that a major blogger would follow this up with such nauseatingly petty discourse, in the context of this gruesome human tragedy, regarding the (non)-impact this sad, little imbroglio had on his blog-ads cheapens the entire blogosphere.

Note:

On a related topic, read this too (subscription required):

"Perhaps the single most disturbing image from this week's riot in Fallujah--in which four American contractors were shot, burned, and dismembered by a joyous mob--was of an Iraqi twenty-something beating a smoldering torso with a long, lead pipe. He rained blow after blow on the charred corpse, which lay on the ground where it had fallen from a car. It was a profoundly wretched scene--and one that, because of editorial decisions made by newspapers and television stations, few Americans saw in full. Many medium- and small-market newspapers led with images of burning SUVs, while burying inside the paper the grislier photos of flesh strung up on telephone wires and bridges. Evening newscasts--those that broadcast the images at all--blurred parts out. Few if any television stations showed the enraged pipe-wielder or another harrowing sequence, in which a red sedan dragged an American's remains through the street, with cheering Iraqis running alongside."

And later:

"But the duty of reporters, producers, and editors is not to soothe their consumers or protect them from cruelty. It is to convey facts--and the most important facts of this week happened to be hanging bits of blackened flesh and a man with a pipe. Often during wartime, the facts are disquieting; at times, they are revolting. None of this changes the U.S. public's need to know. Indeed, the Fallujah riots reveal something fundamentally amiss in American journalism--that an instinct to protect viewers is trumping an instinct to inform."

Indeed.

Posted by Gregory at April 3, 2004 10:11 PM
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