December 21, 2004

A Catalogue of Shame

Here is a brief summary of what I observed at GTMO. On a couple of occasions, I entered interview rooms to find a detainee chained hand a foot in a fetal position to the floor, with no chair, food, or water. Most times they had urinated or defecated on themselves and had been left there for 18 24 hours or more. On one occasion, the air conditioning had been turned down so far and the temperature was so cold in the room, that the barefooted detainee was shaking with cold. . . . On another occasion, the A/C had been turned off, making the temperature in the unventilated room probably well over 100 degrees. The detainee was almost unconscious on the floor with a pile of hair next to him. He had apparently been literally pulling his own hair out throughout the night.

Another FBI report:

Describes Defense Department interrogation witnessed by FBI personnel. I saw [a] detainee sitting on the floor of the interview room with an Israeli flag draped around him, loud music being played and a strobe light flashing. I left the monitoring room immediately after seeing this activity. I did not see any other persons inside the interview room with the Israeli flag draped detainee, but suspect that this was a practice used by DOD DHS . . .

Perhaps the person pulling out his hair was mentally deranged. Perhaps the Israeli flag is some figment of an FBI agent's fevered neo-con conspiracy imaginings. Perhaps. But, of course, perhaps not.

Much more here...including the original Emails in PDF format (courtesy of the Freedom of Information Act).

Not convinced that unpretty things were going down and about to condemn me as a whiney wimp and too eager imbimber of the agenda-ridden ACLU Kool-aid? Look, your perogative. It's a free marketplace of ideas here. I report, you decide. But do read on a bit. Don't miss this report from ABC, for instance, that provides more detail.

A heavily redacted June 25 FBI memo titled "URGENT REPORT" to the FBI director, provided details from someone "who observed serious physical abuses of civilian detainees" in Iraq.

"He described that such abuses included strangulation, beatings, placement of lit cigarettes into the detainees ear openings, and unauthorized interrogations," the document stated. The memo also mentioned "cover-up of these abuses."

Many of these reports were sent by FBI agents to Valerie Caproni, the FBI's General Counsel. She sounds like a pretty cool woman:

If you were to run into Valerie Caproni at a party, you would never guess this 5-foot-tall, 49-year-old native of a small town on the Chattahoochee River in Georgia is one of the most hated general counsel in North America. During her 24 years of practicing law, she has managed to enrage the five Mafia families in New York, a host of Colombian drug dealers, heroin smugglers from Nigeria, white-collar criminals and just about every other lowlife living in New York. About a year ago, she added another group of thugs to her list_terrorists.

In August 2003, Caproni, a former assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of New York, took on the job of general counsel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Among her responsibilities is helping agents understand the legal parameters within which they can hunt down, investigate and detain suspected terrorists.

Looks like she's going to be busy indeed. Stuff happens, after all. And quite frequently, it appears. Still, war is an ugly business, of course. And Rumsfeld can't be held accountable for every last action of a private in some far-flung penal colony (though a different man, confronted with such dismaying torture scandals over the past odd year, might not have written last June: "(h)owever, I stand for 8-10 hours a day. Why is standing limited to 4 hours?") But anyone with half a brain who continues to insist that the torture (sorry, "abuse") story is about a few bad apples taking a frat hazing a tad too much to heart at Abu Ghraib alone are full of it and doing the country a disservice through their intellectual dishonesty. It's clear that, while not some God-awful American gulag archipelago--torture has manifestly occurred in detention facilities from Afghanistan to Iraq to Cuba. Likewise, it's time to say loud and clear that the fact that those tortured are Arab and South Asian detainees is noteworthy. Why? Because it's reminiscent of the different treatment afforded the Japanese enemy as compared to the German during WWII. Recall that the Japanese during WWII, above and beyond Korematsu, were more viciously dehumanized in the popular culture than their less offensive Kraut partners in crime. Put differently, race matters. Can anyone imagine the tortures that have taken place in places like Bagram, Gitmo and Abu Ghraib having been inflicted against, say, Bosnian Serbs in Brcko or Banja Luka? Highly doubtful indeed. 9/11 happened, of course. And Islam has too often been conflated in the popular imagination with the radical jihadists who would so gleefully kill thousands as they did in lower Manhattan that fateful day. Which explains polls like this one (though Orin Kerr of Volokh adds perspective). Still, it's time for intellectuals who care about the moral fiber of our polity, on both the Left and Right, to start speaking more loudly about these worrisome trends. America's better angels, and our more aspirational national narratives, simply demand it.


Posted by Gregory at December 21, 2004 03:10 AM
Comments

"Still, it's time for intellectuals who care about the moral fiber of our polity, on both the Left and Right, to start speaking more loudly about these worrisome trends. America's better angels, and are better national narratives, simply demand it."

For the first time I agree entirely with one of your posts.

This officially approved torture is appalling. We are becoming the enemy, the terrorists. I object on moral grounds, patriotic grounds and even on strategic grounds.

I will, however, point out to you, Greg, that the left has been objecting - speaking loudly - since evidence of systematic torture first appeared.

It has been the right that has attempted to diminish the significance of what occurred. Some on the right have even justified torture. I'm sure they will continue to do so. And that includes those in the Bush administration.

Now it appears that the order to torture came down from the White House. The story is breaking as we sit.

Again, this is what the left is talking about when we refer to the right as "brownshirts", "nazis", etc, etc.

You don't like the name calling, but we've seen this tendency toward moraly compromised barbarism on the right for years; from Allende to the death squads of the contras to the gitmo. From foreign policy to domestic.

No, the left has been speaking out; even predicting this sort of thing from Bush and his cronies. The right called us traitors, cowards, brie eating surrenders, pipe-dreamers, etc, etc.

Just like we were right about the lack of WMD in Iraq prior to the war, we are right about Bush's refusal to go along with international courts and such for fear of being brought up on horrendous charges for crimes planned and planned well in advance.

The left has been correct and vocal. The right has been incorrect and has tried to silence the left.

You, Greg, support Bush. You are intelligent. You were warned by the left. You had the same information available as did the left. You voted for Bush anyhow.

You and all rightwingers owe the left - no, this country- an apology.

Apologize through correct action.

Impeach the traitor Bush.

Posted by: avedis at December 21, 2004 05:12 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Greg, now that I've thought about it, it's takes some moral backbone on your part to write the post even though you are a Bush supporter.

So hats off to you for being a patriot.

Posted by: avedis at December 21, 2004 05:52 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Well said. This has to stop.

Posted by: praktike at December 21, 2004 04:25 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Greg,

I was particularly impressed with your willingness to address the obvious racial elements involved. If only more on the Right and Left could be so, dare I say it, fair and balanced.

You earned your praise here:

http://tianews.blogspot.com/2004/12/in-defense-of-dialectic.html

Posted by: Eric Martin at December 21, 2004 05:34 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

My dear Greg,

I can speak to Guantanamo Bay. More importantly, for validity reasons, so can thousands of regular american citizens. Well, regular in the sense that most of them have returned to their civilian occupation. I wonder that we haven't had hundreds of them going to the press with thier astonishing stories of abuse. I mean - they're right there - National Guard MP's, 18 to 50 years of age, men and women - in the detention blocks, and in the interrogation rooms. Specifically there as part of thier MOS to ensure that there is no mistreatment of prisoners. Heard of the 5 S's?
Why the papers must be full of their tell-all stories of ritual abuse?

They're not? But how can that be? Could it, perhaps, just maybe be that these are horrible isolated instances that need to be properly handled with severe punishment? Yes. But "Catalogue of Shame"? - What - is Aveda guest blogging?

I was there for a year, prying secrets from those poor, misbeggotten souls with chocolate cake and cigarettes. But you don't burn them, Mr. Martin - you offer them a smoke - and watch the transport planes crowd in.

Again, that was Gitmo - I'll have to go down the hall to get ahold of a Captain that had a EPW Company in Iraq, but I'm pretty sure it's going to be the same story. I'll see if I can't get him to console dear praktite.

Posted by: Art Wellesley at December 21, 2004 06:22 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

In WWII, the Japanese were our mortal enemy. It was they who struck our bases and killed our soldiers and sailors. The Nazis were our shared enemy, a more distant and intellectual threat. Given the racial attitudes of the times, it is unsurprising that the Japanese were vilified and portrayed as subhuman monsters. That caricature was only reinforced by the horrific fighting in the Pacific, and the (to Americans) incomprehensible tactics used by the Japanese.

My point? If 19 Bosnians had perpetrated 9/11, and they government and the media then pussyfooted around their national origins and religion, I think you would see the same attitude towards Bosnians as displayed towards Arabs. The real problem is the failure to fully identify the threat, and to allow the appropriate responses, such as profiling, to ameliorate the threat.

Posted by: Chris at December 21, 2004 07:44 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Chris,

I'm confused slightly by your post. You seem to acknowledge the "racial attitudes" circa 1940 in America, which is an apparent nod to the fact that racism was more open and prevalent and played a role in the demonization of Japan and Japanese Americans (Korematsu), but then you seem to deny its significance.

After all, there was certainly spirited fighting with the Germans in North Africa and Europe, and the Germans were known to employ unsavory tactics. Although not as many of a military nature, certainly the abhorrent methods of the holocaust outweighed the horror of Japanese abuses (and there were many). And I question the extent to which the German's were not perceived as mortal enemies, but rather a "distant and intellectual threat."

As for your Bosnian hypothetical, that is the question. You make a statement, but in reality it is an unanswerable question. There is evidence that points both ways, but there is historical evidence that suggests that cultural, ethnic, religious and other differences have fueled a more potent blend of dehumanization than familiarity and likeness.

This is evident in the conflation between Iraqi's and jihadists and Iraqi insurgents and the perpetrators of 9/11.

Not all Muslims and Arabs are alike, and not all Iraqis are jihadists. In fact, it is important to note that as a Muslim nation, Iraq is not particularly known to export young men to the causes of jihad - unlike other states such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, Jordan, Syria, etc., yet our tactics for dealing with each seem similar in their penchant for torture and brutality. And of course, Iraq may become an exporter of jihadists over the course of the next decade as a result of the conflict.

Posted by: Eric Martin at December 21, 2004 08:20 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

A quick correction on the War in the Pacific in WWII.

My Grandfather fought as a Marine in most of those awful island campaigns, he never hated the Japanese but didn't take any prisoners, neither did the other Marines. Prisoners were simply not taken by either side in appreciable numbers. The horrors of Bataan and Wake Island were well known, there was very little incentive to take prisoners or surrender and the fighting was to the death on both sides.

By contrast, British and American soldiers and airmen captured by the Germans received relatively good treatment, which was mirrored by the treatment of the captured Germans. A racial component? No doubt, but also a function of reciprical treatment. Neither Russian nor German POWS fared well in captivity by opposing forces.

Al Queda, the Taliban, and the terrorists in Iraq do not take prisoners, except to torture and execute. Saddam's forces when they did capture US troops briefly are guilty of war crimes (Lori Piestawa was raped and murdered, others were executed, the other gal was tortured, raped, and sodomized so savagely she wears a colostomy bag).

Simply put there is a built in incentive to treat Al Queda, Taliban, and terrorist prisoners badly. I have no doubt that their treatment is often brutal, and in contradiction with the Geneva Convention. However our prisoners will get orders of magnitude treatment worse (before their inevitable execution) and the enemy has no intention of abiding by the Geneva Convention or even simple standards of decency.

Torture is both morally wrong and ineffective (a man will say anything) but I have no problem with rewards for information (serving nothing but pork to Muslims until they answer questions). The enemy is actively trying to kill us; most of these people were caught on the battlefield with weapons trying to kill Americans, "hearts and minds" are about as useless as a UN resolution about chemical weapons.

Most of the complaints are centered around "gotchas" by people with an Anti-American agenda (the Red Cross, Amnesty International) trying to ingratiate themselves with Arab and Muslim countries, and seem centered around mistreatment within the Geneva Convention rather than torture.

Let's not delude ourselves that these people are not our sworn enemies doing their best to kill as many Americans as possible; as such they deserve relatively humane treatment but not the Geneva Convention (until they observe it with our POWs and stop killing innocent civilians in snuff films).

Posted by: Jim Rockford at December 21, 2004 11:05 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

"Most of the complaints are centered around "gotchas" by people with an Anti-American agenda...."

The FBI has an anti American agenda??!!??

Posted by: avedis at December 22, 2004 01:38 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Can anyone imagine the tortures that have taken place in places like Bagram, Gitmo and Abu Ghraib having been inflicted against, say, Bosnian Serbs in Brcko or Banja Luka?

Um. Yes.

Posted by: Blixa at December 22, 2004 05:26 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Jim- "Most of the complaints are centered around "gotchas" by people with an Anti-American agenda (the Red Cross, Amnesty International)".....Do you know what the Red Cross and Amnesty do? Have you ever read a report of theirs, their website, anything? Or do you just repeat what you hear/see on TV/papers? They criticize any and all counties that violate humanitarian laws (Geneva Conventions, etc). If they are anti-American because they (rightly) criticize bad actions...well then, they are also anti- China, anti- Russia, anti-Columbia, ant-....I think you get the picture.

Posted by: amh at December 22, 2004 01:25 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Jim,

The hearts and minds argument against torture does not pertain to the objects of the torture per se, but rather to the population as a whole that will react to images of torture and abuse of members from their society (although innocent victims of torture will certainly impact our efforts).

As for the rest of your answer, it is emblematic of the gross conflation occuring in the "war on terror." Although you seemed to acknowledge that not all the prisoners fall into the categories of Taliban, al-Qaeda or terrorists, you seemed to accept that such a conflation occurs.

One of the main problems with Abu Ghraib was the fact that so many were innocent, and not in fact plucked off the battlefield. In fact, most of the prisoners were released because they were not considered combatants or risks - including children as young as 12.

Similarly, in Afghanistan, there was an incentive for locals to settle scores and cash in on rewards for turning in suspects. Many of these, including children, were not really Taliban or al-Qaeda, just innocent Afghanis caught in the crossfire.

Torture in these contexts is even more detestable, and this is the reason that we as Americans value due process and the rule of law. Above all, it is important for us to aspire to be above those that we call morally unsound and evil. Claiming that we act according to their rules is damaging to our reputation, hurts our mission, and lowers America to depths that offend our sensibilities.

As for reports being from groups with an axe to grind, I would point out that the latest revelations are from FBI memos obtained via FOIA requests, not leaked by people or groups with an "axe to grind." In addition, General Taguba had no "axe to grind" and the Army Times, which documented the deaths/murders that occured at the hands of interrogators in Afghanistan and Iraq, have no "axe to grind."

At a certain point there are too many "axes" to ignore or dismiss.

http://www.armytimes.com/story.php?f=1-292925-2967978.php

Posted by: Eric Martin at December 22, 2004 05:54 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

One is left to wonder exactly *which* intellectuals of the Left you believe haven't spoken out against torture that you wish would do so.

Posted by: flory at December 23, 2004 12:08 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

These sorts of abuses are not new.

See: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/931873.stm

The US army has ordered changes in the way its soldiers are trained after a report found that American peacekeepers had beaten civilians and indecently assaulted women in Kosovo.

Nine officers and low ranking soldiers have already been disciplined as result of the investigation.

But Army chief of staff General Eric Shinseki has ordered that "corrective actions as appropriate" should be taken within 30 days.


I actually thought it would be more like combat


US peacekeeper


A report into the conduct of peacekeeping units in Kosovo has recommended refresher training for the use of excessive force and additional training for searching women.

Defence Secretary, William Cohen has said he had grave concerns about the report's findings on US misconduct.

But he added that the problem should not tarnish the reputation of what he called the accomplishments of the thousands of American troops on peacekeeping duty in the Balkans.

Rape and murder

The investigation was ordered after the rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl.

A US army sergeant, Frank Ronghi is already serving a life sentence for that crime.

US peackeepers are to be retrained


The report into conduct of peacekeepers found that the allegations appeared to be limited to Frank Ronghi's unit.

It gave details of one case where two Kosovo Albanian brothers were taken to an abandoned warehouse and punched in the stomach.

One then had a gun held to his head and was threatened with death.

Soldiers in the unit routinely touched women's breasts and buttocks during searches at roadblocks.

Some of the report was blacked out on the grounds that it was classified information.

Peacekeeping

The findings were that the unit were under the impression that they were going to Kosovo to fight rather than keep a fragile peace between returning Albanian refugees and their hated Serb neighbours.

One soldier, whose name was not disclosed, told the investigator: "I don't think we were prepared for what we came into when we got down here."

"We expected to get fired at and things like that, we didn't expect things to be so calm and laid-back.

" I actually thought it would be more like combat."

The investigator concluded that the unit's overly aggressive tendencies were manifest in its slogan: "Shoot 'em in the face."

_____________

These abuses occurred when Don Rumsfeld was in private life and George W. Bush was governor of Texas.

But I'm sure that's irrelevant to the fact that the story received so little attention that we've already forgotten it.


Posted by: Thomas at December 23, 2004 05:18 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Greg,
The prisoners at Gitmo are not POWs. They are illegal combatants. They do not fall under the definition of legal combatants under the Geneva Convention. They could be treated in any fashion and not vilolate any international law, but, unlike all our enemies since Korea, we have set limits and have not engaged in inhuman torture. The physical and mental strains they have been subjected to are really no worse than what I went through during a fraternity initiation in 1950. When I went through Navy survival school in 1963 I was subjected to much worse physical and mental strain than these prisoners are. This was training to ready us for the really brutal stuff we would have to face if we were caught by the Communists in SE Asia. Ask Senator McCain about the treatment he received and how close it came to the Geneva Conventions. In my humble opinion we are handling these killers with kid gloves and it should be no reason to be ashamed or concerned that the military has done anything illegal or even unethical. So, get a grip! This is war and it is not for weenies.

Posted by: Jim G. at December 23, 2004 05:31 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Jim G, is it really the case that your frat brothers tied you up in painful positions and left you without food or water for 24 hours at a gime so you shit and pissed yourself? Raped you? Sodomized you with foreign objects? Rolled you over razor wire? Tied you up in a sleeping bag and hit you till you died? If so, I would definitely complain to the parent chapter, because that shit ain't right.

Posted by: belle waring at December 23, 2004 10:18 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

d'oh, "gime=time". Preview is your friend!

Posted by: belle waring at December 23, 2004 10:28 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Belle,
Yes, we went through that and more, except for the dying part. Are you a lawyer? Maybe I can sue for mental anguish or some such trumped up charge.

Now show me the verified proof that any illegal combatants at GITMO went through any of the horrific things that you mention.

The place has been under a microscope of human rights organizations almost from day one. Not to mention some weepy FBI agents and Navy JAG officers with less than steel in their backbones.

Several of the prisoners who were released from GITMO have already been recaptured in Jihadistan.

Yet we should go on treating them like they were uniformed members of recognized combatant forces ala the Geneva Convention. That way lies self deception and eventually - defeat.

I know what it is to go without food or sleep, to be confined in a small space for hours on end, and go wihout mental surcease for days at a time. It isn't any fun and it can break many men/women. However, it is not life threatening and, if it can bring actiopnable intelligence, so be it.

By the by, all intelligence gatherers know that a dead prisoner tells no secrets. Any time a prisoner and potential source of intelligence is killed it is most likely to be a horrendous mistake.

Posted by: Jim G. at December 24, 2004 04:01 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Playing texas holdem at http://texas-holdem-000.net right now is a great idea, i thing!

Posted by: texas holdem at December 24, 2004 11:43 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Whant casino at home? Go to online casino games at http://online-casino-games-000.com!!!

Posted by: casino games at December 24, 2004 01:08 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

"By the by, all intelligence gatherers know that a dead prisoner tells no secrets. Any time a prisoner and potential source of intelligence is killed it is most likely to be a horrendous mistake."

Jim raises an excellent point. One - ironically enough - ususally raised by the left, as the despairage the "war-bloggers".

Namely - how is it all of you fires-of-the-homefront fathers know so damn much about the professional intricacies of intelligence work, anyway? Semester or two of comparative politics at the local State College? You ought to get teaching jobs at West Point of Quantico - your country desperately needs your keen insight.

Posted by: Art Wellesley at December 27, 2004 08:23 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

refinance
mortgage rates
mortgage calculator
debt consolidation
home equity loans
home loans
home equity line of credit
bad credit loans
refinance mortgage
florida mortgage

http://www.mcfimortgage.com
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagerates/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagecalculator/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/debtconsolidation/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequityloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequitylineofcredit/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/refinance/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/floridamortgagecompany/

Posted by: refinance at December 31, 2004 05:21 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

refinance
mortgage rates
mortgage calculator
debt consolidation
home equity loans
home loans
home equity line of credit
bad credit loans
refinance mortgage
florida mortgage

http://www.mcfimortgage.com
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagerates/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagecalculator/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/debtconsolidation/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequityloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequitylineofcredit/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/refinance/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/floridamortgagecompany/

Posted by: refinance at December 31, 2004 05:26 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

refinance
mortgage rates
mortgage calculator
debt consolidation
home equity loans
home loans
home equity line of credit
bad credit loans
refinance mortgage
florida mortgage

http://www.mcfimortgage.com
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagerates/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagecalculator/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/debtconsolidation/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequityloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequitylineofcredit/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/refinance/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/floridamortgagecompany/

Posted by: refinance at December 31, 2004 05:29 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

refinance
mortgage rates
mortgage calculator
debt consolidation
home equity loans
home loans
home equity line of credit
bad credit loans
refinance mortgage
florida mortgage

http://www.mcfimortgage.com
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagerates/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/mortgagecalculator/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/debtconsolidation/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequityloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeloans/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/homeequitylineofcredit/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/refinance/
http://www.mcfimortgage.com/floridamortgagecompany/

Posted by: refinance at January 1, 2005 09:27 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Nice acticle.Try my site bad credit mortgages OR online bad credit mortgages bad credit mortgages online Direct - http://bad-credit-mortgages.redi.tk ohio mortgage rate OR ohio mortgage rate ohio mortgage rate Direct - http://ohio-mortgage-rate.redi.tk fha mortgage rate OR fha mortgage rate fha mortgage rate Direct - http://fha-mortgage-rate.redi.tk mortgage rate ny OR mortgage rate ny mortgage rate ny Direct - http://mortgage-rate-ny.redi.tk mortgage rate comparison OR mortgage rate comparison mortgage rate comparison Direct - http://mortgage-rate-comparison.redi.tk mortgage refinance california OR mortgage refinance california mortgage refinance california Direct - http://mortgage-refinance-california.redi.tk Thanks

Posted by: mortgage rate ny at January 3, 2005 03:01 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Nice acticle.Try my site bad credit mortgages OR online bad credit mortgages bad credit mortgages online Direct - http://bad-credit-mortgages.redi.tk ohio mortgage rate OR ohio mortgage rate ohio mortgage rate Direct - http://ohio-mortgage-rate.redi.tk fha mortgage rate OR fha mortgage rate fha mortgage rate Direct - http://fha-mortgage-rate.redi.tk mortgage rate ny OR mortgage rate ny mortgage rate ny Direct - http://mortgage-rate-ny.redi.tk mortgage rate comparison OR mortgage rate comparison mortgage rate comparison Direct - http://mortgage-rate-comparison.redi.tk mortgage refinance california OR mortgage refinance california mortgage refinance california Direct - http://mortgage-refinance-california.redi.tk Thanks

Posted by: bad credit mortgages at January 3, 2005 03:12 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Nice acticle.Try my site buy cheap cigarette OR buy cheap cigarette buy cheap cigarette Direct - http://free-buy-cheap-cigarette.redi.tk cheap marlboro cigarette OR cheap marlboro cigarette cheap marlboro cigarette Direct - http://cheap-marlboro-cigarette.redi.tk dirt cheap cigarette OR dirt cheap cigarette dirt cheap cigarette Direct - http://dirt-cheap-cigarette.redi.tk cheap discount cigarette OR cheap discount cigarette cheap discount cigarette Direct - http://cheap-discount-cigarette.redi.tk cheap cigarette carton OR cheap cigarette carton cheap cigarette carton Direct - http://cheap-cigarette-carton.redi.tk cheap newport cigarette OR cheap newport cigarette cheap newport cigarette Direct - http://cheap-newport-cigarette.redi.tk cheap camel cigarette OR cheap camel cigarette cheap camel cigarette Direct - http://cheap-camel-cigarette.redi.tk cheap winston cigarette OR cheap winston cigarette cheap winston cigarette Direct - http://cheap-winston-cigarette.redi.tk cheap cigarette usa OR cheap cigarette usa cheap cigarette usa Direct - http://cheap-cigarette-usa.redi.tk Thanks

Posted by: cheap winston cigarette at January 4, 2005 10:26 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Nice acticle.Try my site buy cheap cigarette OR buy cheap cigarette buy cheap cigarette Direct - http://free-buy-cheap-cigarette.redi.tk cheap marlboro cigarette OR cheap marlboro cigarette cheap marlboro cigarette Direct - http://cheap-marlboro-cigarette.redi.tk dirt cheap cigarette OR dirt cheap cigarette dirt cheap cigarette Direct - http://dirt-cheap-cigarette.redi.tk cheap discount cigarette OR cheap discount cigarette cheap discount cigarette Direct - http://cheap-discount-cigarette.redi.tk cheap cigarette carton OR cheap cigarette carton cheap cigarette carton Direct - http://cheap-cigarette-carton.redi.tk cheap newport cigarette OR cheap newport cigarette cheap newport cigarette Direct - http://cheap-newport-cigarette.redi.tk cheap camel cigarette OR cheap camel cigarette cheap camel cigarette Direct - http://cheap-camel-cigarette.redi.tk cheap winston cigarette OR cheap winston cigarette cheap winston cigarette Direct - http://cheap-winston-cigarette.redi.tk cheap cigarette usa OR cheap cigarette usa cheap cigarette usa Direct - http://cheap-cigarette-usa.redi.tk Thanks

Posted by: cheap marlboro cigarette at January 4, 2005 03:38 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

PHENTERMINE

Posted by: PHENTERMINE at January 7, 2005 06:24 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

PHENTERMINE

Posted by: PHENTERMINE at January 7, 2005 07:09 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink
Reviews of Belgravia Dispatch
"Awake"
--New York Times
"Must-read list"
--Washington Times
"Pompous Ass"
--an anonymous blogospheric commenter
Recent Entries
Search
English Language Media
Foreign Affairs Commentariat
Non-English Language Press
U.S. Blogs
Columnists
Think Tanks
Law & Finance
Security
Books
The City
Western Europe
France
United Kingdom
Germany
Italy
Netherlands
Spain
Central and Eastern Europe
CIS/FSU
Russia
Armenia
East Asia
China
Japan
South Korea
Middle East
Egypt
Israel
Lebanon
Syria
B.D. In the Press
Archives
Categories
Syndicate this site:
XML RSS RDF

G2E

Powered by