July 13, 2005

Kudos To...

...former B.D. guest blogger Joseph Britt who has an op-ed in today's Washington Post. Go check it out without delay, and join me in congratulating Joe!

P.S. FYI, rumor has it that Joe will be participating in an on-line WaPo chat-room to discuss the op-ed tomorrow.

Posted by Gregory at July 13, 2005 11:16 PM | TrackBack (0)
Comments

Chat will be at 1:00 PM EDST. Just go to http://www.washingtonpost.com/, click on discussions and follow the prompts.

The Post's people are telling me their chat platform is very stable and nothing I could possibly do could cause it to crash, make the paper's online edition appear in Russian, or any other bad thing. I believe them. No, really. Any BD readers who do want to send in questions (this can be done in advance or live) should mention this site -- I'll do my best to get to you. The topic, as BD readers from last April and May have probably figured out by now, is the Arab reaction to genocide in Darfur.

Posted by: JEB at July 14, 2005 01:52 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

JEB, FYI -- Egypt has articulated that its only interest in Sudan is basically to retain one negotiating partner over Nile water rights. They're very concerned that the Sudan might fragment, and so they don't want to support any policy that could reinforce separatist tendencies. Cold, perhaps, but it's quite rational. I believe the US gov't has made some moral compromises there as well. The name Gosh comes to mind ...

Posted by: praktike at July 14, 2005 11:02 PM | Permalink to this comment Permalink

Trust me, praktike, Nile water rights are not Egypt's only interest in Sudan. They aren't a good reason either for silence on the subject of Darfur by the Egyptian press, silence about that silence from the Western media, and silence about Arab indifference to Arab genocide not only from our government but from all other Western governments.

The way to ensure that situations like Darfur, North Korea, Bosnia and Zimbabwe happen again and again is to act as if local powers in the area have no responsibilities to maintan some level of civilized order. If the United States could be everywhere and had resources to spare for all these emergencies this wouldn't be an issue, but we can't and we don't. The issue is not an academic one of relative moralities but a practical matter of preventing disasters in the context of a relatively stable international system -- apart from which, in this case, we are in the absurd position of urging democracy and human rights on a whole people whose comfort level with mass murder we are afraid even to discuss.

Posted by: JEB at July 15, 2005 02:45 AM | Permalink to this comment Permalink
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